Scott, 43

Meet Scott…

“I am a soldier in God’s Army and a strong prayer warrior.” 

Scott, 43

Incarcerated: 7 years

Housed: Valley State Prison, Chowchilla, California

My family are very strong supporters of St. Jude Research. I lost three family members to cancer and believe that no one should lose anybody to cancer. I am a soldier in God’s Army and a strong prayer warrior. My family has a strong history of serving in the military and one of my favorite memories is when my dad shared our family’s story with St. Jude Radio. This is what he shared, “On May 17, 1974 my son was born and I left for my tour to West Pac in July. When we reached Pearl Harbor I received a message that my son had cancer. He lived to be nine months and 18 days old. The day of his death he looked up at me, then his grandma, then his mom, then up to the ceiling, then back at his mom, waved bye-bye, then back up to the ceiling to say- I’m ready to die. In October of 1989, my wife was diagnosed with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma and in June of 1992 she died. At her service I sang the song, “Remind Me Dear Lord.”

My mom was a loving, caring woman and she spent the last six months of her life helping my elementary school with anything they needed.  

Alyce, 71

Alyce, 71

Meet Alyce…

For five days I was never given water. I was placed in a rehabbed storage room with no bathroom. I was escorted, sick with covid, to a public bathroom.

Alyce, 71
Incarcerated: 7 years
Housed: Corona, California

I was sent to the triage and treatment area because I was exhibiting Covid symptoms. I tested positive. A doctor I didn’t know was on the phone ordering I be sent to the Riverside University Hospital because of my age and being a high medical risk. Because of previous experience at that hospital, I emphatically refused to go. I signed a refusal. I was then placed in the correction treatment center. In doing so, the person in charge came to me to discuss my Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) order and  my contact information to inform my sister, in case I was sent to the hospital. The next day, going for x-rays I collapsed into unconsciousness. I was told by nurses that I became unresponsive, I was seizing and had quit breathing. I don’t know what life-saving measures were taken, but when I opened my eyes, there was a room full of people around me. A man that looked like a doctor was congratulating a lady for her quick action. When I next came to, I was in an ambulance and life-saving measures were being implemented. My DNR was ignored… again. When I came to again, I found out I was in Riverside University Hospital. I demanded to be sent back to prison and signed the refusal… twice, but it did not happen. The treatment there was outrageous.

For five days I was never given water. I was placed in a rehabbed storage room with no bathroom. I was escorted, sick with covid, to a public bathroom. I had to wear my street clothes the entire stay, and was never allowed to bathe, wash my face or hands. I was made to suffer with a migraine for 13 hours before they would give me a prescription. I demanded to be sent back to prison. I removed my own I.V. never saw food and did not see a single person until the next day. The doctor finally sent me home to prison. On my way out of the basement I saw beds lined end-to-end in the hallways, full of other inmates, homeless people, itinerant workers, mentally ill and children! Who does this? I have never seen anything like this in my life or have been treated this horribly. I’ve met several other inmates who met the same fate there. Why is this allowed? That’s what I want to know.

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