Angela, 52

Angela, 52

Meet Angela…

When I started my sentence in 2021 I felt all alone. Now I have a companion always with me.

Angela, 52
Incarcerated: 1.5 years
Housed: Avoyelles Women’s Correctional Center, Cottonport, Louisiana

Since my incarceration I have become a new creature in Christ Jesus. I never sat down long enough to get to know my savior. Now, I was baptized in the water here inside these prison walls. Now I take my 15 year sentence and devote my time to studying the word… No drug, no amount of money can compare to the freedom I have been given by the Holy Spirit. When I started my sentence in 2021 I felt all alone. Now I have a companion always with me. I learned that no matter what situation you face it is important to have peace and joy. Joy must remain because Christ suffered for us, and we share in his suffering. One thing prison or man can’t take from me is my attitude of being thankful, loving, gentle and humble. Never let anyone take your peace and joy. My motivation is in Jesus, knowing I messed up in life but I have been forgiven by just asking God to forgive me and turn from sin. Now I know when my time is done on earth I’ll be with my savior. (Eternal rest) Theology (Study of the word) is the highest education anyone may ever get… I encourage everyone out there to find freedom inside prison walls. God’s word will set all captives free.

Dale, 51

Dale, 51

Meet Dale…

Last year I helped over 90,000 Californians and I’m on track for over 100,000 this year. I focus on those people. Not following the rules got me in prison but what better thing could I be doing.

Dale, 51

Incarcerated: 26 years

Housed: Valley State Prison, California

I work in a Prison Industry Authority optical factory. It produces thousands of pairs of glasses each week. After my parole violation was extended for a 5th time in 2021, I was a bit despondent and depressed. Shortly after I was approached by my correctional counselor and asked if I would be interested in a job in optical. At first I hesitated for a couple reasons: one, people who have done nothing wrong had been fired for the actions of others. Second, it required getting up very early, for an eight hour a day, 5 days a week, for a fraction of a dollar per hour. I had become accustomed to no such obligation, and I had become lazy. I didn’t take the application, but immediately something nagged me. I decided to approach the counselor. During the interview I told the supervisor my concerns, and said all I hoped for was: not to be held accountable for anyone else’s behavior and acknowledged for the job I do. I did my best. I started to notice the many different frames and styles. It occurred to me that each represented a different person. Women, men, boys, girls and infants.

I started having this joy of imagining different people. My considerations and thoughts kept going to the Californians behind these frames waiting for their prescriptions. I often hear complaints: the hours, the pennies for pay, the cops, but all I could think about are the people behind the frames who didn’t know or need to know me. But I get to be a help to each of them! After several months my work ethic put me in a position to run a department. It was here I started counting how many Californians I helped each day. When other guys complain, or I get ridiculed for hard work, I’d walk up, grab a pair of frames and state, “This may not be your sister, brother, daughter or son, but it’s someone’s and I work because people need their glasses.” Last year I helped over 90,000 Californians and I’m on track for over 100,000 this year. I focus on those people. Not following the rules got me in prison but what better thing could I be doing. The value I get is the great feeling that no matter what past mistake I made, I am helping people. 

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